bell hooks on Cultural Critique

bell_hooks.jpgPost-modernist intellectuals tend to appropriate the experience of “difference” and “otherness” to further their own tropes. This leads to a dismissal of concerns of representations, even as the latter continue to mutate and re-inscribe old stereotypes and prejudices in our consumerist society. As bell hooks argued, it is a matter of concern that there is no meaningful connection between the lived experiences of the “others” critical thinking about aesthetics or culture. As hooks informs us the larger problematic of the subaltern project is its inner contradiction. For example, while the black movement in the US and the dalit movement in India talks about centering the oppressed voices, this discourse is ensconced in the language of patriarchal modernity (western or otherwise). Thus, there is the lack of any dialogue about patriarchy within these groups. Coming back to the point about the importance of cultural critique in a post-modern world, hooks demonstrates the “how-to” critique with an array of examples and spares no one — white, feminists, or blacks. Her reading of popular culture perhaps drives home the point that more than before, it is important for us to engage in critical study of media, communications, and culture. hooks analyses different aspects of popular culture from white icons such as Madonna to Black icons such as Spike Lee to demonstrate how capital and greed underpin these media texts.

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Introduction

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 2

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 3

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 4

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 5

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 6

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 7

bell hooks on Cultural Criticism and Transformation: Part 8

One thought on “bell hooks on Cultural Critique

  1. “It is to me a perfect paradigm of colonialism
    that is to say, we think of rap music as a little third world country
    that young, white consumers are able to go to and take anything they like out of it.”

    “there’s no correlation often betwen the consumption of the commodity that is blackness
    and the culture from which that commodity comes, or that provides the resource base.”

    good post.

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